Wild Abandon of Inner Mongolia

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Being invited to the Gobi Desert in Inner Mongolia for a Landscape-themed Photography Exhibition was exciting in many respects, and not just because I was showing my work.  It was a wonderful opportunity to experience the life and culture of the far reaches of western China.

The landscape was a study in contrasts: smooth waves of sand dunes interrupted by tall, vertical smokestacks. People were scarce, yet humanity was demanding energy. I walked through well-planned cityscapes with hardly a person around to enjoy it. And every day there was a cold, hard sun beating down without any warmth. The land is far-reaching, isolated from the bustling civilization of major Chinese metro areas.